Jacques Louis David – Death of Marat

Jacques Louis David – Death of Marat

Death of Marat by Jacques-Louis David proves that Masterpieces have baggage too. This well-known piece speaks to us from the French Revolution. Unfortunately, it doesn’t speak the truth.

Duken Delpe

Duken Delpe

Computers provide the paint brush for Duken Delpe’s art. He knows their workings well. So, Duken uses each piece in his work with insight.

Van Cortlandt House

Van Cortlandt House

The Bronx holds no greater surprise than the exquisite Van Cortlandt House Museum. It’s an elegant estate – like a cake topper for the big city below.

Leon Kossoff – Here Comes The Diesel

Leon Kossoff – Here Comes The Diesel

Here Comes the Diesel by Leon Kossoff feels like a fight. Viewers must battle our way through the choppy chaotic brambles to even see the title’s train.

Simon Vouet – Wealth

Simon Vouet – Wealth

Baroque painters, such as Simon Vouet, reveled in allegory. They swam in it, like Scrooge McDuck in his pool of gold coins.

Guiseppe Crespi – The Flea

Guiseppe Crespi – The Flea

The Flea by Guiseppe Crespi tells a story without revealing the main character. We only see the reaction to the flea, not the pest itself.

Benjamin West – Venus Lamenting

Benjamin West – Venus Lamenting

Venus Lamenting the Death of Adonis by Benjamin West tells an ancient story. The beloved goddess Venus fell hard for heartthrob hottie Adonis. But it was not meant to be.

Fernand Leger – The Wedding

Fernand Leger – The Wedding

Cubism learned a lesson or two when Fernand Leger’s The Wedding hit. In fact, many art historians joke that this painting introduced Tubism… because reality curves into glorious tubes in this remarkable work.

Paul Delveux – Siren in Full Moonlight

Paul Delveux – Siren in Full Moonlight

Paul Delveux’s painting, Siren in Full Moonlight creates a mysterious triptych of past, present, and future with light and shadow.

Mario Gonzales

Mario Gonzales

Mario Gonzales paints monsters and men. There’s little difference between them in his edgy, intriguing work. Famous for his tagline When it Reigns, I’m Poor, Mario makes art that speaks to the city.

Marc Chagall – The Rooster

Marc Chagall – The Rooster

Many misinterpret Marc Chagall’s work The Rooster. LadyKflo explains – it’s not just about sex.

Lewis Latimer House

Lewis Latimer House

Lewis Latimer made history many times. From improving the lightbulb to helping Alexander Graham Bell, he’s a hero of invention and ingenuity.

Crixtover Edwin

Crixtover Edwin

A focused figurative artist, Crixtover Edwin paints magical portraits. This painter bridges the fantasy reality gap with a delicate touch and bright details.

Dyckman Farmhouse Museum

Dyckman Farmhouse Museum

New Yorkers know the name Dyckman. But many aren’t aware that this notoriety started with Dyckman Farmhouse. Luckily, it endures as a vital, engaging museum in Upper Manhattan.

The Cloisters – NYC

The Cloisters – NYC

The Cloisters graces Upper Manhattan with art, peace, and quiet. Not a religious place, it still feels like a spiritual sanctuary. That’s thanks to the calming spaces and extraordinary art collection.

WaterColor by Antonio

WaterColor by Antonio

WaterColor by Antonio lifts and lightens bodies with his work. There’s profound depth as well. That’s because strong lines and archetypal themes ground the work.

The Lott House

The Lott House

The Henrick I. Lott House makes the long trek into Deep South Brooklyn well worthwhile. This 1719 home itself makes history.

Running Works

Running Works

Hitting the road on foot keeps me happy and sane. Running works because it’s an ingrained habit. Daily jogs clear my mind. It’s not something I think about. I just do it.

Randi Matushevitz

Randi Matushevitz

Los Angeles painter, Randi Matushevitz reminds us badass babes are ageless. Her Ugly Portraits thrill me in a world buried behind cuteness filters.

Lefferts Family Farmhouse

Lefferts Family Farmhouse

The Lefferts family continue to influence Brooklyn today. That’s thanks to their family storyteller, Gertrude. Her books and stories give us a better picture of Brooklyn history

The Immigrants

The Immigrants

The Immigrants sculpture celebrates and portrays desperate longing all at once. It’s only steps across a path from Castle Clinton in Battery Park.